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User IDNameImage 1Image 1 DetailImage 1 Notes
Miffy GilbertImage 1

A lovely herbaceous perennial - quite hard to grow where I live. Also, anything with green "flowers" has my vote. I love that the petals are reduced to yellow filaments and the bracts take centre stage in framing the reproductive parts. Always a joy, surprise and relief when the Paris shows itself after a long winter. I hoped to capture the sun bouncing off the leaves and play on light that resulted on all the contours while still being botanically accurate. Loved painting this plant and I hope my joy shines through.

Hee Soon BaikImage 1Image 1 Detail

Description of the picture number in the Image 1 Detail file

1. plant 2. back of pinna 3. pinnule 4. indusium
5. opened indusium & sori 6. sporocyst 7. spore 8. tiller 9. scale

Hilary Jean GibsonImage 1

I bought this orchid for my Mum many years ago for Mother’s Day, since when it has flourished and been divided many times.
I drew it in her conservatory when the light provided a stunning tonal contrast and it was this wonderful chiaroscuro that I was keen to capture. My mum was able to watch me drawing and see the image not many years before she passed on, and I know sure would have been very proud when it was shown in the Society of Botanical Artists exhibition this year at the Mall.
This drawing was also exhibited at the Society of Graphic Fine Art in 2021.

Nicole Oliver PentucciImage 1

This vine is located in an abandoned vineyard on the escarpment behind our cottage on land which once belonged to the farm.

Julia BettisImage 1
Katerina Luna (Kravchenko)Image 1Image 1 Detail

‘Allium cepa’ got the Certificate of Botanical Merit in 2021
Even though the painting was exhibited I wanted to include it in application as this is one of my best works

Sabine LoosImage 1Image 1 Detail

Image 1

Helleborus spec., Ranunculacea

I appreciate and love the plant family of Ranunculace very much. It is considered as a very original plant family. When this Helleborus hybrid caught my eye, I was immediately fascinated by the rich petal colour and the contrast of its nectar leaves and stamens. Especially, I love and care for plants in my garden, that provide for insects. This Hellebore flowers very early in spring and feeds early insects. I enjoyed the lovely balanced colour contrast of this beautiful flower while painting this traditional inspired portrait.

Ingrid ArthurImage 1
Maryna StasyukImage 1

Watercolour painting on A4 sheet of Arches Grain Satin Hot Press paper

Maria CostakeImage 1
Nadia DeonImage 1Image 1 Detail

2022, the most recent work.

John Pastoriza-PinolImage 1Image 1 Detail

This painting won the 2017 Silver Medal, Science and Art, Past and Future, Shenzhen, China.

Jauneth SkinnerImage 1
Christine MossmanImage 1

This decaying leaf shows the richness of autumnal colours in their full splendour. The seeds of this tree are used for the game of conkers.

NERMIN KAYIKCIImage 1Image 1 Detail

RBGE Dist.Dip.BI Native Tree project 'Magnolia Grandiflora'

Leda TurnerImage 1

Needing a circuit breaker from a challenging piece, I thought a little study of this lingering veg box onion would provide a reset. I became obsessed and couldn't stop. Papery skin, melting layers, interesting sprouts.

Antoaneta DenkinImage 1Image 1 Detail

Two Pitahaya , or so called Dragon fruit

Aleksandra GorchakovaImage 1
Jeannine Távora CobraImage 1Image 1 Detail
Stefanie OttensImage 1

Brugmansia in in diverent stages of flowering and with one of the typical bigger leaves.

Emma TildesleyImage 1Image 1 Detail
HyeJin LeeImage 1Image 1 Detail

The peony flower is large and colorful, but it has a noble beauty.
The peonies I drew are bright and elegant in color.
It is light pink. Not dark but never light
There is no beauty. I love the elegance of this flower
I tried to express myself well. of two
The harmony of the colors of flowers and leaves was also eager to be expressed.

Hilde OryeImage 1

This is the first work of a series on garden plants and weeds that function as hostplants to butterflies. Starting point is what I see in my own garden and surrounding area. The purpose of this series is to entice people to let weeds have their place in the garden as well. Weeds can grow perfectly in harmony with the regular garden plants. I believe that both are valuable to the biodiversity and if more garden owners would do this, then all the gardens combined would become one big nature reserve.

Anuradha Sarin KhuranaImage 1Image 1 Detail

Growing in pockets of the Aravalli Hills, India, Boswellia is part of a 3.2 billion year ecosystem.
A rapidly declining habitat threatened by illegal mining, groundwater toxicity and desertification - old growth Boswellia are now unusual to find.
This painting is part of my ongoing project in observing this tree through the seasons. Accessibility to the trees is extremely difficult due to thorn growth, non existent trails and leopards. Additionally, lack of information about the Aravalli Boswellias is part of the many challenges faced by me in documenting this plant.

Angelina CheongImage 1Image 1 Detail

Hoya pubicalyx. Instead of graphite, I decided to use the fine liner pen in warm grey for the leaves in the background. As luck would have it, a Mourning Gecko (Lepidodactylus lugubris) was spotted lounging in one of the umbels. Perhaps after a feast of the nectar?

User IDNameImage 1Image 1 DetailImage 1 Notes