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508

Sabrina Sang hui Yu

Graduated from University Painting Department
SBA DLDC 16.Graduation

-2022 National Sejong Arboretum Cactus Special Exhibition/Korea
-2021 National Baekdudaegan Arboretum Astar Exhibition/Korea
-2021 Botanicalart Invitational Exhibition/Lira Gallery, Korea
-2020 National Institute of Ecology Cactus Exhibition/Korea
-2019 A Journey of Plants In Taipai Botanical Garden /Taiwan
-2018 KNA Special Project /Seoul Botanic Park,Korea
-2018 Botanicalart Special Project /Korea National Arboretum
-2018 Plants. Myths and Legend/Moskva Russia
-2018 Exhibition of Botanical Art -New Horizons /Saint Petersburg Russia
-2017 Botanical art Exhibition /Beijing
And participated in many other exhibitions.

*Essay publishing while working on a cactus project.
-A cactus garden blooming at your fingertips./co_auther

When I draw plants, I try to capture the language they express. Interpret emotions by composing pictures in flower language and observing the state of plants.
After my father's death, I fell into depression and deep sorrow, but I was able to heal and return to my normal life by painting the message of plants. By participating in 5-6 exhibitions a year, I established myself as a plant artist and taught plant art to people. In particular, we shared the joys and concerns of pregnancy by drawing flowers while conducting antenatal classes for pregnant women at the hospital. As the curriculum for healing emotions by drawing botanical art became known, public health centers are giving lectures to the general public.

I work with dry materials and watercolors, and I am particularly confident in graphite. Gray and white are created with an pen pressure and eraser, and the black color that darkens endlessly into the texture of the paper is attractive.By collecting pencils from various countries, I made a black-and-white color chart to compare and analyze. When drawing watercolors, I layered colors to find natural colors, and took a colorology course to use colors freely.

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Rose

The sunlight flowing through the texture of the petals was expressed.

purple tulip

Dancing Daylily

I expressed Daylily as an illustration, but
Long leaves and flower heads are shown in a dancing composition.

Japanese cornel dogwood

Lisianthus Bouquet

507

Sora Han

Exhibition
Goyang International Flower Fair (May 2016 Ilsan Lake Park)
Shanghai Botanical Garden Botanical Art Exhibition (April 2017 in Shanghai, China)
19th World Botanical Congress (July 2017 in Guangzhou, China)
Beijing Botanical Garden Botanical Art Exhibition (September 2017 Beijing, China)
National Arboretum's Special Plan: Various Plants in Fine Painting (October 2018 in Korea)
A special exhibition on the daily lives of plants (Seoul Botanical Garden in November 2018)
Cactus Garden Bloomed in Fine Flowers (National Ecological Center, Korea, December 2020)
Cactus Garden Bloom

A joint publication
Cactus Garden on Fingertips (2021)
Let's draw flowers together (2020)

I usually use colored pencils to complete the picture. I like the cozy feeling that I can feel from colored pencils. However,y i enjoy using different art materials from time to time. I try to use the most suitable material to represent the plants I'm trying to draw. When plants are painted on paper through me, I feel very rewarding when the beauty of plants is transmitted to others. In the future, I want to communicate with plants, express its beauty and wonder in pictures, and let many people know the importance of plants.

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Rosa hybrida

The roses that had just begun to wither looked pathetic and beautiful. The vivid pink petals, faded pink petals, and scratched petals were combined to give a richer feeling.

Rosa hybrida

I wanted to draw a rose that shows off its beauty. I wanted to balance by calming down the colorful pink atmosphere with a pencil.

Cornus kousa F.Buerger ex Hance

The white petals of Cusa Dogwood were very dazzling. When I first saw it, the petals were so white that I couldn't see it. The flowers seemed to be visible thanks to the deep blue leaves. I tried to paint green and white in contrast.

Bougainvillea glabra

When I first saw this flower, I thought it was a fake flower made of paper. When painting, I tried to express the texture of the petals as thin as possible.

Pelargonium inquinans

I liked the deep pink so much that I decided to draw this flower. I chose a dark pink marker as the base to express this color. Flowers in nature sometimes have a fluorescent feel in their colors. It was very difficult to express the color. However, I succeeded in expressing that color and it became my favorite result of the colors I expressed.

506

Hyojung Kim

I was an art major – specifically industrial design major in both undergraduate and graduate school, but my passion for botanical art motivated me to deepen my studies. Later, I ended up being an executive officer in The Botanical Artist Society of Korea, while giving out lectures about botanical art and pencil sketching. In 2017, and 2018, I was invited to FABER-CASTELL WORKSHOP ACADEMY in Nuernberg, Germany, and had an opportunity to widen my perspective. Furthermore, I received the National Biological Resources Director Excellence Award in the Botanical and Zoological Art Competition in 2020. I have been running Regular Exhibition, Instructors Work Exhibition by The Botanical Artist Society of Korea, and several botanical art exhibitions by Cheollipo and National Arboretum annually for over 5 years until now.

Initially, I focused on applying graphite and colored pencil to my work. However, my current interest lies in painting using watercolor and other art media including gouache, vellum, acrylic paint, etc. I am looking forward to attempting to create not only botanical artworks but also World Attraction Landscape sketches by using diverse tools and applying unique methods.

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Ilex cornuta 'Sam Souder'

Chinese Holly, 2020

Tropical Leaves

2019

Hosta 'Christmas Candy'

2021

Mahonia aquifolium(Pursh) Nutt.

Oregon Grape, 2019

Frangipani

Plumeria, 2018

505

Baroque ANARCHIST

Baroque Anarchist is the alter ego of Alexandra Suvorova, a London based, visual artist,
who sees striking parallels between the contemporary moment and the Baroque epoch,
which she mines for artistic guidance and inspiration. Born in Moscow during the 1986
Chernobyl Disaster, Suvorova has always been fascinated by the quest for immortality
through science and art, and the vulnerability and strength of the body. Layering
contemporary art practices into her background in Baroque painting and theatre design -
tracing the present to its past, Baroque Anarchist creates contemporary works that are
deeply personal, yet unafraid to tackle bold themes and contemporary issues.

Suvorova obtained a BFA in painting and an MFA in stage and costume design at Surikov
Art Institute in Moscow, as well as a degree in contemporary painting at Moscow’s Institute
of Contemporary Art Issues (CAI) in 2012. In the same year, she was awarded a PhD in
Theatre Design from the Department of Painting at the Russian Art Academy in Moscow.

Art is my refuge from external conditions and the medium through which I explore my
emotions. I have a personal score to settle with Death, which has taken some of my loved
ones, including my unborn child. I see art as a weapon to fight mortality, just like science,
and I use art to explore vulnerable life, the body, and scientific efforts to achieve immortality.
Years of formal training in fine art, contemporary art and theatre design gave me
a love of the Baroque. Like now, the Baroque epoch was a period of scientific discovery,
opulence and excess. Revolutionary research of that time laid foundations for the modern
disciplines of anatomy, biology, astrophysics, and information technology. My practice
considers current projects to overcome mortality, like organ cloning and space exploration,
whilst looking back to see how Baroque artists engaged with the innovations of their day.

In this time of social, political and ecological upheaval, I find comfort in the Baroque masters’
materials and layered techniques of painting, which have endured the test of time. Following
their strict method for each work, I make a compositional sketch, followed by a drawing, and
then I make a grisaille in a brown-white tone.

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Eden

The artwork Eden was inspired by the reading about the biblical garden Eden where humans were immortal.

Me vs Me

The main battle we fight is usually inside of us. This artwork is very personal, I created it when I fought for my health.

Spilling Tulip

I love experimenting with controlled drawing and painting and then it is all done to add some element you cannot control as freely spilling paint.

Ray of Hope

I created this work during the pandemic time and it is a painting -praying/ painting -the symbol for me.

Nest Near Thyroid Tulip

It is one of my favourite artworks. it has been exhibited in many shows.

504

Jae-young Kim

After graduating from an art high school in South Korea, i majored in design at Offenbach University of plastic arts in Germany and has been doing botanic art since 2016.
In 2018 i I came in second place of ' The Botanical Artist of Korea' contest and participated in the Botanic Art Instructor's Exhibition and ' The Botanical Artist of Korea' regular exhibition every year.

I usually work with watercolor pencils and enjoy drawing using ink, pen, charcoal, sanguine, etc.
In addition to botanic art, I am interested in landscape painting, and these days, I am interested in academic expression by observing plant life for a year.

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Corydalis incisa (Thunb.) Pers.

It is a native Korean plant, and it is expressed academically by observing the ecology for a year.

Scabiosa

This is my personal work that I worked on in 2020.

Lacy tree philodendron

The characteristics of the straight stems and curved leaves are expressed in watercolor pencils.

Rhododendron 'solidarity'

It's one of my graduation paintings, using ink and water.

Pine-cone Plant

It's a my graduation work that uses Gouache paints.

503

Cheryl McCaffrey

Cheryl is an American botanical artist who paints in watercolors.

After a long break from art making, Cheryl began studying botanical painting in 2016 with Sarah Roche at Wellesley College Botanic Garden and earned a Certificate of Botanical Art and Illustration (CBA) in May 2022. She is a member of the American Association of Botanical Artists (ASBA) and the New England Society of Botanical Artists, and regularly exhibits in the NESBA member shows. She has contributed 3 articles to the ASBA journal, the Botanical Artist. Cheryl is a graphic designer and enjoys bringing her experience in design and her attention to detail to her botanical painting practice.

EDUCATION
Certificate of Botanical Art (CBA), Wellesley College Botanic Gardens, May 2022

EXHIBITS
Wellesley College Botanic Gardens, CBA Graduate Exhibit / Wellesley, MA, May 2022

New England Society of Botanical Art (NESBA) Member Exhibit / Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Boylston, MA, March 2021

NESBA Virtual Member Exhibit / "Tis the Season for Winter Wonder", nesbaartists.com, December 2020

Dare To Be Square, Small Works / ASBA Members Virtual Exhibit
asba-art.com, October 2020

Boston Flower & Garden Show with NESBA / World Trade Center, Boston, MA, March 2020

For me, drawing and painting is about slowing down and observing what’s around me by looking closely at all the details of a natural object. I try to capture these intricacies in my art – details that might otherwise be missed unless you are looking really closely. I enjoy observing and documenting the delicate, perfectly imperfect details found in nature. I paint many layers of watercolor to achieve depth and detail. Both nature and painting continually reveal to me lessons of patience and resilience.

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Winter Twigs

To me, there is nothing like the first flowers that bloom after a long, cold winter and these little pops of purple bring me so much joy. In the spring, these tiny crocus fill fields in the Arnold Arboretum next to snowdrops and it's like they are singing (lead education director, Sarah Roche, suggested the clever and apt title, "The Supremes.") This was part of my final project (total of 6 paintings) for the CBA at Wellesley College Botanic Gardens.

The Supremes

To me, there is nothing like the first flowers that bloom after a long, cold winter and these little pops of purple bring me so much joy. In the spring, these tiny crocus fill fields in the Arnold Arboretum next to snowdrops and it's like they are singing (lead education director, Sarah Roche, suggested the clever and apt title, "The Supremes.") This was part of my final project (total of 6 paintings) for the CBA at Wellesley College Botanic Gardens.

Fields of Buttercups

Buttercups fill fields right around this time of year, in May and June in the Arnold Arboretum (this is my second painting for my final CBA project). The meadows are filled with these happy little yellow blossoms along with delicate grasses. I love how the blooms are top heavy and seem to hang down in each direction, almost as if they are nodding - expressing how happy they are to be alive.

Signs of life

I found this stag beetle years ago in my backyard and I thought it deserved to be memorialized with some other objects depicting cabinets of curiosity. I loved depicting all the textures, from the shiny beetle to the wrinkled leaf, and the ribs on the shells and all the ranges of browns and purples. As a botanical artist, I love collecting bugs, butterflies, shells, and dried specimens, and I wanted to preserve all of these objects in a painting.

Indian Corn

I love the contrast of color and texture of this subject - the smooth, shiny corn kernels against the papery husks, and the deep jewel tones against the light, airy tones. I wanted to capture this contrast and also how still the kernels are versus the husks which seem to be dancing.

502

Antoinette Luchessa

A perpetual student, Antoinette’s current focus is on native plants of the Pacific Northwest, with an artistic emphasis in 3-D paper botanical renditions, graphite pencil drawing, and pen and ink illustrations.

Education:
• Bachelor of Arts in Art (Emphasis Painting and Printmaking), San Diego State University
• Certificate of Botanical Illustration (with Distinction), Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 2018

Select Exhibitions:
• “Plantae” On-Line Exhibition, Society of Botanical Artists, United Kingdom, 2020
• “Reflections: no plant — no planet” Virtual Exhibitions, Association of British Botanical Artists & The Shirley Sherwood Gallery, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London, United Kingdom 2021
• GNSI Virtual Conference Juried Members Exhibit”, Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, 2021
• Plus several juried exhibitions (listed on website)

Awards:
• 3rd Place, “Wild Treasures: Oregon’s Native Plants in Contemporary Botanical Art”, Oregon Botanical Artists and The Oregon Society of Artists, Portland, Oregon, 2021

Website:
• https://www.antoinetteluchessa.com/

Social Media:
• https://www.instagram.com/antoinette.luchessa.art/

A Pacific Coast native, I have lived the majority of my life in the Pacific Northwest. As an artist, I am continuously inspired by the natural environment around me.

Following in the footsteps of Mary Delany, my work is paper focused. I begin my 3-D paper botanicals working flat, using watercolors, acrylics, and colored pencils on a variety of papers. From there I manipulate the paper into realistic shapes and add elements as needed (wool, wire, thread, etc.) to further develop my botanicals. They can be fairly low-relief, such as my Among the Shadows, or more high-relief like my Darlingtonia californica. My work is faithful to botanical representation but offers a unique interpretation. This original interpretation of botanical art is what I can bring to the Society.

One idea germinating is to create a series or collection of native plants to represent the diversity of the Pacific Northwest with the goal of encouraging conservation.

Collecting specimens from the North Cascades to the Salish Sea, I gather native plants, lichens, and seaweeds to study and recreate in paper. My paper botanicals capture the essence of the living plants, reflecting their colors and capturing their shadows.

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Among The Shadows

Acer macrophyllum, Lobaria pulmonaria, Neckera douglasii, Thuja pilcata. This composition was inspired by specimens found on a walk in a local forest. The leaves are made of two different types of papers, painted with watercolors and embellished with colored pencil. The lungwort is a third type of paper that has been emossed to create the typical indentations and textures of lungwort. It was painted with acrylic paint. The moss was made with thread and the cedar twig out of paper, wire, acrylic paint and colored pencil.

Cobra Lilies

Darlingtonia californica, unknown fern. The closeup is at an angle so you can better see the details of the pencil work. This composition was inspired by cobra lilies growing in my garden. They were made from a variety of papers molded into shape, and the stem is supported by wire. They were sized with gesso, painted with acrylic paints and then embellished with colored pencils. The unknown fern was made with wire and light-weight paper.

Interconnected

This was included in “Reflections: no plant — no planet” Virtual Exhibitions, Association of British Botanical Artists & The Shirley Sherwood Gallery 2021. My accompanying essay: "Interconnected. All life on our planet is interconnected, from the foundations of life in the simplest of seeds, to complex land and marine plants, to the decomposers; connected on air, wind, soil and sea; climate change threatens this intricate web. These species represent biodiversity in and around the Salish Sea." The closeup is at an angle so you can better see the detail.

Oregon White Oak Leaf

Quercus garryana. I found this gorgeous oak leaf in one of our local wildlife areas and was transfixed by it. My drawing received 3rd Place, “Wild Treasures: Oregon’s Native Plants in Contemporary Botanical Art”, Oregon Botanical Artists and The Oregon Society of Artists, Portland, Oregon, 2021

Chrysanthemum

This was drawn for exhibition in “Mums and More”, Lan Su Chinese Garden, Portland, Oregon, 2019

501

Penny Kaufman

Now in my late 70’s. Much travelled as an army daughter with art always being my best subject but sadly no art college etc. completely self taught. Family, horses and life with painting in spare moments mostly birds, portraits and still life. I have exhibited, sold and run art classes.
A heart attack 6 years ago was not only a shock but art was the one thing I settled to that gave me back my confidence for which I was grateful to have had this gift to fall back on.
Joining a tutorial group in Salisbury with Sally Pond proved invaluable. Sadly COVID put a halt, so only a few meetings but making a good friend and a generous great advisor in this journey. Having worked hard to continually improve, some recognition would be the icing on the cake. Too old and too ‘poor’ to attempt your diploma course, I would be thrilled and honoured to join the SBA family.
I hope my paintings speak for me.

I first started my botanical journey before lock down and with a limited no of tutorials with Sally Pond I became smitten. I have painted all my life and contacted Billy Showell for advice on my work. She liked my loose way of painting but suggested I go away and practice in the botanical way which I have done daily for the last two years, always using the best paint brushes and paper. Sable brushes, mostly no2, Winsor and Newton watercolour tube paint in my chosen colours and the usual hunt for the ideal paper. I have by now a fairly extensive reference library which has helped in my lone pursuit. Being a keen Knowledgeable gardener I have lots of subject matter. Also a keen photographer I use my own photographs as that way the pressure is taken away of wilting flowers before my eyes.
With today’s technology at our finger tips I am part of the Instagram (creativepennyk) worldwide community of artists, following and being followed by renowned respected Botanical artists who generously share their skill and knowledge.
Art is a gift and one I appreciate to try and improve and enjoy.

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Camellia

This painting of a Camellia from my garden is in my journal that I have been working on for the last two years. It shows the deep green gloss of the leaves with droplets of water. Each work has been executed to the very best of my ability. I would not call this a sketch book. My small garden is full of inspiration.

Anemone

The gorgeous colour of this Anemone with its Corolla of petals and dark middle was a joy to paint. The second photo shows the value tones in black and white. My aim is to get as close to capturing the true colour as I can and seeing it in black and white is helpful in criticising my own work.

Tulip

The study of the top tulip is again in my journal but no less executed to the best of my ability. Capturing the detail colour light and little Hover fly.

Auricula

This is such a classic plant to capture. Nothing to add. The second photo shows work in progress. I am building a collection in my garden so I can study and capture the many variations of colour.

Orchid

This beautiful Orchid is in its 6th year and quite intricate to capture with glossy leaves and root system. I stopped as afraid to overwork the painting. The way the leaves join the main stem make it an interesting subject.

500

Paula de la Cruz

I hold a degree of Communications Design from Pratt Institute in New York. I also have a certificate of Professional Horticulture from NYBG, where I focused on botany and taxonomy. I have written about gardens, botanical art, travel and culture for many US publications. I divide my studio between Hawaii and New York.

Dear SBA Members,
I divide my time between Hawaii and New York. I am interested in endangered species and unusual cultivars. My strongest technique is graphite, silver point, and colour pencil. At this moment I am focusing on further perfecting watercolour techniques. Looking through a microscope is endlessly fascinating and hope to incorporate that into my next series. In the next few months I will continue to develop my Apple a Day series which are now comprised of 13 paintings. In 2020 I developed a podcast PALOOLA: Botany is in (Almost) All Things (https://anchor.fm/paloola) where I connected botany with different industries. My work has been published in Air France Magazine as part on an article I wrote about the Amazon journeys of Margaret Mee.
A botanical education has allowed me to observe my surrounding environment in depth, whether in the country or the city. I relied on this capacity during the hardest months of the pandemic to stay centered and connected.
I thank you in advance for your consideration.
Kind regards,
Paula de la Cruz

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Liatris

This drawing is part of a series called Roots, Modified in which I illustrated different modified root plants.

Cyclamen

This drawing is part of a series called Roots, Modified that illustrates different modified roots.

Paphiopedilum (Laser 'Rainbow' x Maudiae 'Prieta)

This drawing is part of a series Roots, Modified

Hidden Rose apple

This painting is part of a series of unusual apples called An Apple a Day.

Knobbed russet apple

This painting is part of a series called, An Apple a Day.

499

Annie Chen

Education:
1. Master of Accounting
2. Master of Mind and Cognition Philosophy

Background:
1. 1997~2015: Deloitte Consulting, Executive Director
2. 2015~2018: Maze Technology, CEO
3. 2020~now: TABA, Director

Exhibition History:
- RHS Botanical Art and Photography Show 2022, London UK, SILVER-GILT MEDAL , 2022
- LST 11th Annual Botanicals online exhibition, Special Contribution, USA, 2021
- Inspiring Plants Exhibition, Taipei, Taiwan
- Taipei River Art Season,Taipei Taiwan, 2021
- Solo exhibition, Cheng Mei Art Gallery, Chang Hua, Taiwan, 2021
- RBGE (Royal Botanical Garden Edinburgh) Florilegium, Edinburgh UK, 2020
-Solo exhibition, Tan Mei Art Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan, 2020
- Plantae 2020, The Society of Botanical Artist (SBA), Mall Gallery, London, UK, 2020
- Society of Artists of Botanical Art (SABA), Moscow, Russia, 2019
- Solo exhibition “The Inner Bloom”, Jia Art Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan, 2019
- Botanical Art Department, Japan Grand Prix International Orchid Festival, Tokyo, Japan, 2016

A trip to the Amazon rainforest changed my life. After 20 years in the world of business, I became a self-taught botanical artist. Encouraged by the acceptance by a botanical art exhibition in Japan in 2016, I have started to paint more and more just for the habit. In 2020, I become a full-time botanical artist and keep promoting the beauty of the art in Taiwan. Besides creating arts, I sometimes work as a curator of art exhibition.
I have started to enjoy life from art creation and I am committed to bringing an awareness of nature envirnment protection through my art.

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Warczewiczella amazonica

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Aechmea setigera

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Masdevallia veitchiana

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Racinaea undulifolia

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Cattleya maxima

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498

Alan Taylor

Born 1958
'O' and 'A' level Art
Foundation Year at Barnsley School of Art
Leeds Polytechnic (Beckett University) BA(Hons)
Since then I have been continuously self employed as an artist.
Currently artist-in-residence, Wortley Hall, Sheffield.

When not running painting workshops at Wortley Hall or painting commissions I paint and draw the things around me. I live in a converted barn in a rural location. I paint flowers, mainly in watercolour but also acrylic and sometimes oil.
My inspiration comes from my own garden (my wife is passionate about growing flowers) and the gardens of Wortley Hall.

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Iris

Growing in our garden from a roadside cutting.

Sunflower

Grown in our garden from a seed.

Allim Schubertii

A commission.

Hydrangea

From a friend's garden.

Sweet Pea

Grown in our garden.

497

Marianne Hazlewood

Marianne Hazlewood Dip BI is a Scottish, RHS Gold award-winning botanical illustrator. Hazlewood, born in Edinburgh and residing in Carlops, Scotland, lived in Nigeria as a child, returning to Scotland for holidays and high school. She began her artistic career as a graphic designer and subsequently studied Botanical Illustration at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE).

Hazlewood won RHS & BISCOT Gold Medals in 2019.
Her work has been featured in various botanical society group exhibitions including Flora Scotia in conjunction with World Botanical Art Day in 2018, the Scottish Society of Botanical Artists (SSBA), and the Edinburgh Society of Botanical Artists (ESBA).

Hazlewood shows with the Society of Scottish Artists (SSA) and Visual Arts Scotland (VAS) Open exhibitions. She was a recipient of the VAS Open Eye Gallery Exhibition award in 2019 and had a solo show with the Open Eye Gallery in October 2020. She also shows as a solo artist at the annual Pittenweem Arts Festival.

Her work has been published in Gregory Kenicer’s Scottish Plant Lore: An Illustrated Flora (RBGE, 2018), and has featured in The Botanical Artist, (Journal of the ASBA, 2019).

Hazlewood is a tutor on the Diploma in Botanical Illustration

I like to cultivate my plants, sourcing and growing my specimens to learn their nature before referencing them for my illustrations. This time, nurturing leads to a deep connection with them and gives me insight into their growing cycle.

I create modern botanical illustrations with a number of media, specialising in detail, creating photorealistic depictions of the plants with which I work to demonstrate structure, pattern and tone.

I create work using a dip pen and Japanese ink paste. My ‘ink shoots’’ series is currently conducted in monocolour allowing pattern and structure to take prominence whilst retaining accurate botanical detail. I often choose to incorporate more than one specimen and I allow a discourse between the plants, viewers have personal space for imaginative interpretation, which I encourage because I want viewers to think about these plants as living, not just background information in their environment.

I also work in watercolour in a dry brush format, and in the printed form. In ‘Arisaema geometric stylings’, I have taken some of my ink drawings through a further screen-printing process, blocking out forms and reintroducing colour tints to satisfy my love of colour and graphic styling.

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Arisaema cilliatum inkshoot

A. cilliatum is quite diminutive, very upright and slim, its structure and elegance stood out to me as many Arisaema can be quite stocky and sturdy. I chose to promenade the plants across my page in various stages of inflorescence development to show how tightly wrapped the foliage and inflorescence are and how they unfurl and open out.

Arisaema costatum inkshoot

Arisaema costatum inflorescence usually appear in tendem with their leaves. I wanted to show this development in two stages, as a juvenile shoot just starting to appear from the cataphylls and at a later stage, displaying the trifold leaflets still in the act of unfurling.

Arisaema griffithii var Pradhanii inkshoot

This illustration shows a mature Arisaema griffithii var Pradhanii with its 'offshoot' or 'offspring' growing close at hand. When the tuber is mature, it produces new growth shoots and small tubers from its extremities, which over time separate off forming a circle of new plants around the main tuber.

Arisaema griffithii inkshoot - smaller

Demonstrating the tightly packed cataphylls at quite an early stage, starting to release their inflorescence and leaves.

Arisaema griffithii inkshoot - larger

Demonstrating the tightly packed cataphylls at a slightly later stage, starting to release their inflorescence and leaves.

496

Kristine Rapohina

Painting and creating all my life but fell in love with Botanical Painting and watercolors in 2015. Started practicing on my own, attended master classes of Vincent Jeannerot, and in 2016 applied documents for SBA London Diploma Course. This experience really helped my botanical artistic journey and with each assignment, I became better. Graduated in 2019 with Distinction.
Working as a full-time artist since 2020, painting every day, working with online students, creating tutorials and enjoying the beauty of Botanical Art with watercolors.

The paintings that I paint are those subjects of Nature that I see around me throughout the year. I love to capture plants that are available at certain times of the year. Showing the best of each plant, it can be small as berries from the wood or magnificent as Chrysanthemum flower head. Seeing beauty in all Natures forms is what I love most about Botanical Painting. I can say with confidence that my eye-sight became much better and my attention to smallest details is amazing 🙂
Technique that I work consists of many many layers of transparent watercolors, building slowly volume and saturation of the subject. First I see base colors of the subject beyond details, building that base color and at the end all attention goes to details - the beauty what I see first in plants I almost always paint the last!

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Red Field Poppies

Chrysanthemum

Alstroemeria Pink and Red

White Tulips

Red Amaryllis

495

Anneli Frisk

I have a master of art in technical illustration from the University of Mälardalen.
DipSBA(Dist)
Plantae 2021

My name is Anneli Frisk and I am an illustrator who lives and work on the countryside in Sweden. My work in mainly performed by hand in watercolours or pencil on paper. I love nature and the opportunities and variation in colour and shape that it offers me as an artist. Recently my main interest has been the flora of the northern forest environment.

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Trifolium pratense

Flower portrait of Trifolium pratense. Commission for PostNord. The Scandinavian post company.

Vaccinium vitis-idaea

Flower portrait of Vaccinium vitis-idaea. Commission work for PostNord - The Scandinavian post company.

Fragaria vesca

Flower portrait of Fragaria vesca. Commission work for PostNord, the Scandinavian mail company.

Hippeastrum in grey

Hippeastrum in grey. Made on paper in pencil. Personal work.

Red Tulip

Red tulip. Commission work

494

Catherine Halliday

As a child I always loved anything creative and at school my art teacher said once, “ here is a budding artist”. This started the dream. Whilst studying my GCSEs I was unable to concentrate on drawing so lost confidence. I left art behind for a few years until I decided to have ago with watercolours. My main source of inspiration was flowers and in 2007 I did a distance learning course with the London art college for botanical illustration with Moyà Davern. I found it very challenging and I was ignorant to the difference between botanical painting and illustration. This took away my enjoyment and confidence in painting flowers but I was introduced to pen and ink. This I enjoyed very much and suited my way of working. I exhibited three pen and ink drawing in the Society of Botanical Artists exhibition in 2008 which I was very proud of. That year I applied and was accepted to exhibit with the RHS. After this I started to do miniatures and recently have been inspired by RHS Garden Bridgewater. I have exhibited with the Hilliard Society a number of times and the Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Sculptors and Engravers several times most recently last year.

I currently concentrate primarily on miniatures of garden scenes in watercolour on Arches, hot pressed paper. I also draw flowers and plants in pen and ink on hot pressed paper using the stippled technique.

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Iris reticulata Harmony

Pulmonaria

Paradise Garden, RHS Garden Bridgewater

Community wellbeing Garden, RHS Garden Bridgewater

Paradise Garden, view 2, RHS Garden Bridgewater

493

Henny Herawati

I was born in a small town in Central Java, Indonesia. Started studying watercolour in 2012 in Paris, I have fallen in love with botanical painting in 2015 when I was back to my home town in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Painting of botanical arts is my daily activities as an house wife, taking advantage of being in Indonesia as largest source of orchid and other exotic plant.

I currently works on botanical arts with watercolour on paper and also colour pencil on paper. Five of my botanical arts were used as ilustration in Guido J. Braem's book "The Genus Paphiopedilum" published in 2021.

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Bulbophyllum Lobii

This orchid has an unique labellum that nodded.

Nepenthes Rafflesiana Lower Pitcher

This plant is an endangered species which is Indonesian origin.

Paphiopedilum Canhii

This plant is an endangered species.

Paphiopedilum Fairrieanum Alba

This kind of orchid is "en vogue" and categorized as endangered species.

Vanda Limbata

This orchid is originally from Java island, Indonesia, and has fragrant scent.

492

Shimmi Koh

I am a botanical Artist in South Korea. For serveral years I've lessoned the botanical art at some art classes.
I studied botanical art and graduated at Flora Academy of Seoul women's university. After graduation, I trained the special course for botanical instructors and certified as a professional botanical art instructor.
Every year I have exhibitions in 'Kwangreung' national arboretum and 'Cheonripo' arboretum since 2020.
Every year I participate in some group exhibitions - it makes me keep going and have new perspective as an artist.

In the early season, I used color pencils for flower painting. As time goes by, I prefer watercolor painting. My painting interest has enlarged from flowers to various plantae - tree, fruit, vegetables and so on.
I'd like to work with seasonal theme and have exhibitions.

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Jujube

Jujube is one of popular fruits for traditional tea and desert in Korea. In autumn jujube show the beautiful changing color on its skin. I'd like to express the luxury of harvest.

Fritillaria Persica

When I met Fritillaria Persica in the flower market, I felt into love with them at a glance. Stem and leaves looked dancing. Flower color was attractive to me. I wanted to express the beauty of them.

Elaeagnus pungens 'Variegata'

I found the Elaeagnus pungens 'Variegata' in the national arboretum green house. It has unique leaves - little bumpy texture on leathery skin. I'd like to express its texture on paper. Even though it wasn't easy to express it, I enjoyed painting.

Meoconopsis betonicfolia

It's not easy to find the Meoconopsis betonicfolia in South Korea.
Korea summer weather is hot and humid so it is unsuitable to grow the Hymalayan Poppy. It live in alpine region. Therefore I see them on book and photos. When I visited the Hakone Botanical Garden of Wetlands in Japan, I met them finally. I was very happy to see them. I express the fantastic blue flower's beauty.

Cornus kousa 'Miss Satomi'

Usually white dog wood trees are general in South Korea. Nowadays some other species are cultivated more and more.
Miss Satomi has beautiful pink petals and edible fruit.
In Autumn leaves show the beauty of changing colors.

491

Simeï Snyman

Currently I primarily work as a bespoke jewellery designer and in my free time I'm developing my personal artistic language. Having graduated from the Chelsea school of Botanical Art last year, I'm still exploring the aesthetic balance between botanical and jewellery painting. Alison Wright's book 'Frame Work' is an incredibly inspiring source of reference and context with framing being an area I wish to incorporate and build on more. Using the botanical subject as the foundation and expanding on and around this with various interlinking subjects to create a multi dimensional framed work, is the idea I am currently working on in my practise. These interlinking subjects and mediums include the use of vellum, silverpoint, framing (to different extents), calligraphy, jewellery gouache painting and of course watercolour botanical painting. My approach is reminiscent of illumination work, without a direct theological basis. The aim is also to create a new space for botanical painting in our contemporary era, by incorporating lesser practised techniques such as silverpoint and vellum painting.

I’m a multi-disciplined artist & designer working as a creative for clients across fine jewellery and luxury.

Creating high-end and commercial jewellery designs I blend the natural and the noble resulting in unique and timeless pieces both in concept and design. Having studied at Central Saint Martins, l have a BA in Jewellery Design and is one of the few specialists skilled in fine and technical gouache jewellery painting.

As a highly-skilled illustrator and painter, I produce a variety of different works from scientific and technical drawings to fine paintings, prints and patterns. Studying botanical painting at the Chelsea School of Botanical Art I've developed a keen eye for observational study with an exceptional ability for fine detail.

Growing up in South Africa was a privilege to be immersed in exploring the beauty and diversity in nature. Working full time as a bespoke jewellery designer has helped to train my eye for observing detail and a curiosity in the application of botanical forms as wearable art.

The variety in the Geraniaceae family, especially with origins in South Africa, has created a perfect match for my continuing research and subject matter.

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Erodium glandulosum

Also known as Black Eyed Heronsbill. Loaded with charm, this long-blooming plant forms a low tuft or mound of ferny olive-green leaves. Orchid-like flowers appear from late spring through to the fall, in a pale pink with purple veins and purple blotches on the upper two petals, shade with deep violet-black spots or eyes. One of the hardiest Heronsbill species. Foliage is said to be fragrant. A cousin to the familiar Cranesbill Geraniums.

Geranium cinereum

This early-flowering, dwarf geranium has small, deep pink flowers with striking pink veins and centres and pretty, deeply cut, grey-green leaves. Provided it has good drainage, it will produce an attractive neat cushion of foliage from which - rather shy, bowl shaped pale pink flowers appear in summer.’

Geranium phaeum

It forms a dense, weed-suppressing matt of green, deeply lobed leaves with distinctive purple blotches around the centre, from which small, nodding, purple flowers with yellow centres appear on tall stems, from late spring to early summer.

Geranium phaeum is known for attracting bees, birds and other pollinators. It nectar-pollen-rich-flowers and has seeds for birds.

Pelargonium bowkeri

This member of the Geraniaceae family was described by William Henry Harvey 1822 is found in Southern Africa; KwaZulu-Natal, Lesotho in rocky slopes.

Night-scented; finely dissected leaves; fimbriated flowers coloured taupe with a yellow green base; purple veins on lower petals; winter dormant.

Pelargonium bowkeri is a deciduous, tuberous herb, one of the caudiciform Pelargonium species that stores water in a thick rootstock.

Common names include: Carrot-leaved Pelargonium, Cat’s tail Pelargonium & Frilled Pelargonium.

Pelargonium carnosum

A deciduous, fleshy-stalked, shrubby pelargonium up to 60 cm tall with a woody, swollen, tuber-like rootstock. It has a feathery foliage similar to some of the erodiums. It is dormant or semi-dormant in summer.

Thick grey-green, highly succulent, gibbose knotted stem. Joints few, short, erect and rugged with only few apical leaves.

Leaves on long mid-ribs are pinnatifid, laciniate (ferny) soft, downy and somewhat fleshy too.

The inflorescence is a long-pedunculate, many-flowered umbel. The flowers are tiny, creamy pink or pink-crimson with some markings. Petals are linear.

490

Agita Keiri

Agita Keiri is in Edinburgh-based artist with in-depth knowledge of diverse mediums, techniques, and equipment. Formally educated in drawing and painting since elementary school, Ms. Keiri first started working on botanical painting in 2016. In 2018, she she completed the Society of Botanical Artists' distance-learning course diploma with distinction and joined the Scottish Society of Botanical Artists (the SSBA). During this at the same time she attended and received a certificate with distinction for the Botanical Illustration program in Royal Botanical Garden of Edinburgh. She has exhibited her botanical work in several exhibitions in the UK and received a Cass Award and a certificate of botanical merit in the SSBA 'Plantea' exhibition in Mall Galleries, London (June 5-9, 2019).

Ms. Keiri was born in Latvia, where she studied drawing and painting at J. Rozentala Riga Secondary School of Art (1991-1997). She attended the Painting Department of the Latvian State Academy of Art, completing a Bachelor's degree in 2001 and a Master's degree in 2003. She is creative, highly detail-orientated and willing to improve techniques and processes through continued training and education.

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Hornbeam__Native Trees

Dried fruit garland

Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm.

Banksia

Moth Orchid

489

Maureen Newell

I have been learning and practising Botanical Art since 2007, and it has seen me through some very dark times. I studied for the SBA Diploma Course 7, 2010 to 2012, and proudly achieved a credit.
I went on to exhibit in 3 SBA Annual Exhibitions, and was thrilled to sell a painting in my first exhibition.
Success is a great motivator, and it inspired me to continue on my journey, after many moments of self doubt about my abilities as an artist.
I have attended many workshops with Gael Sellwood since 2007, until Covid struck, and I enrolled on some online courses with Jackie Isard and and Diane Sutherland.
I have also exhibited locally, which I love to do.
I am always looking for the next challenge. It is my way of personal progression.
Being accepted as a member of the SBA, has always been my biggest artistic challenge........to date.

"How long did it take you" is the most frequently asked question.
"I don't know" is my reply.
I love to lose myself in my art.
It is by far the best form of therapy that I know of.
I spend many hours, days, weeks, months, years, learning, practising, failing, succeeding, and more importantly enjoying this amazing art form.
I am not looking for perfection, as I do not think it exists , though I am always looking to improve myself in any small way that I can.

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Dried Hydrangea - Black

This hydrangea was part of a beautiful bunch of flowers, given to me by my brother and sister in law, on my 60th birthday on 25th October 2021. I loved it so much, I decided to include it in my submission to The SBA for Fellow Membership.
I love to paint subjects that have a meaning to me, and this was very personal.

Autumn Hydrangea-Green

A beautiful Hydrangea, blue in the summer, turning pale blue and green in the autumn.

Autumn Hydrangea Study

I have a passion for dried Hydrangeas!

Autumn Leaves

A collection of crispy, curly and colourful Autumn leaves, collected from walks around the village, and from my garden.
The leaf facing the opposite way, represents me!

Rosa Alibaba

A fading Alibaba Rose, picked from my little garden.
I love this rose, as the colours fade with age.
A joy to paint.

488

Cristiane de Melo

CRISTIANE DE MELO

Brazilian and Italian
48 years old
Married, 2 sons

Academic Background:
2006-2007 FACULDADE SENAI CETIQT, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
Post-Graduation in Fashion Design
1992-1995 UNIVERSIDADE ESTADUAL PAULISTA - UNESP, São Paulo - Brazil - BS in Economics

Botanical Academic Background:
2017 BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION II
2018 BOTANICAL DRAW
2019 BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION I
Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro
Escola Nacional de Botânica Tropical ENBT - JBRJ. Brazil

Career:
2019-2021 BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATOR INTERSHIP at Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro - RJ – Brazil
2022 BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATOR at Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro - RJ – Brazil
2022 BOTANICAL ARTIST FREELANCER (Commissioned Botanical Works), RJ – Brazil

Media:
Watercolor, Colored Pencil, Graphite, Scientific Illustration (Nankin ink)

Exhibitions:
Oct/2019 – Semana Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia – Jardim Botânico Rio de Janeiro - Rio de Janeiro – Brazil
Dec/2019 – NAATIVA Brasileira – Núcleo de Mídia, Artes e Tecnologias - Paraty – Brazil

Languages:
Portuguese – Native ; Italian – Fluent; English -Good knowledge

Cristiane was born and raised in Ribeirão Preto – SP – Brazil. She got her B.S. in Economics from UNESP at age 22 and afterwards Post Graduation in Fashion Design from SENAI/CETIQ Rio de Janeiro.
She lives in Rio de Janeiro and worked for several years in the Fashion business, as product manager, visual merchandising and sales.
However, the love for arts, specially drawing and watercolor painting, led her to change her career path. With particular interest in nature, Brazilian tropical plants and botanical species, she decided to become a professional artist in 2017.
She attended Illustration and Drawing courses at National School of Tropical Botany – Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden, having as her professors Mrs. Malena Barretto and Mr. Paulo Ormindo. Cristiane then got the Botanical Illustration Internship at Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden.
Cristiane has also cross intercultural experiences living in many cities in Brazil, as well as Johannesburg – South Africa and Milan – Italy.
Currently, she works as Botanical Illustrator Freelancer for the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden and undertakes privately commissioned work.

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Allium cepa

This is a Scientific Botanic Watercolour made from the live species.

Allium cepa - Amaryllidaceae
Moulin du Roy Paper 300g/m2
100% cotton

Musa sp

This is a Scientific Botanic Watercolour made from the live species.

Musa sp - Musaceae
Moulin du Roy Paper 300g/m2
100% cotton

Dried Leaf

This is a Scientific Botanic Watercolour made from the live species.

Undefined species, collected on Serra da Mantiqueira, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Moulin du Roy Paper 300g/m2
100% cotton

Cucurbita sp

This is a Scientific Botanic Watercolour made from the live species, with cross section.

Cucurbita sp - Cucurbitaceae
Moulin du Roy Paper 300g/m2
100% cotton

Zantedeschia

This is a Botanic Illustration, done with graphite pencil and photograph reference.

Zantedeschia aethiopica (L.) Spreng. - Araceae
Bristol Paper

487

Sophie Kruijssen (artist name Crossart)

Born in the Netherlands in 1989, I have taught myself to paint from a young age and have never stopped painting since. I academically trained in Art History, obtaining my BA in 2010 and MA in 2012. During my MA, I moved to Munich, where I interned at the Neue Pinakothek and received my PhD from LMU in 2016. The depiction of nature and the everyday world have always been key themes in my research. I now live in Heidelberg and work as a professional artist since 2019.

I consider the combination of my academic background and artistic work as a unique skillset I bring to the community. I teaching my own weekly botanical art course at the Volkshochschule in Heidelberg in March — combining botanical art and art-historical connections — and plan to expand my teaching through Zoom and patreon.com later this year. Since April 2021, I share my work and skills on Instagram (@sophiecrossart). I work on commissions, contribute to local exhibitions, and sell online as well as straight from my studio. I illustrated my first book in 2021 (Lydia Rood’s Hartfalen). It would be my privilege to continue my professional activities under the SBA’s banner, and help building and maintaining this wonderful and supportive community of botanical artists!

In our modern digital age, painting nature is my way of retaining a sense of authenticity, connection and certainty in life. At the heart of my work is my fascination for intricate natural details. I carefully observe these and isolate them in paintings “grown” from pigments and paper or vellum to capture the fulfilment we experience when we encounter something seemingly insignificant that turns out to be endearingly beautiful.

As humans, we have an urge to preserve the things that touch our hearts on our journey through life. By transferring the fleeting qualities I find in nature to works of art, I aim to turn them into lasting experiences and sources of familiarity and inspiration. By occasionally paring my botanical subjects with items from natural history I push this idea further and explore humanity’s relationship with the themes of change and time. With my own interpretation of “Memento Mori”, I advocate the experience of the beauty of life, instead of the fear of loss.

Materiality is key in my work. I like to emphasise the act of applying watercolour pigments and the precious quality of vellum and cotton paper. By painting life size and small scale I invite my viewers to experience this from up close.

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Vitis vinifera (var. Chenopodia)

A commission piece for a local wine maker, who grows this variety of vine - one of the oldest types in the region (since the Romans).
The commissioner is deeply familiar with this species, and specifically requested me to show the rich colour transitions of the leaves and berries, as they turn dark in September. He suggested to designate the variety as “Chenopodia” based on historical sources, and requested the inclusion of the local coat of arms in the painting, which I incorporated as a tag in the same way his father and grandfather tagged their vines and fruit trees.

Memento Mori IV (Bounty)

The fourth painting in my Memento Mori series: the end of the cycle of life, before it begins again. The bright colours and fruits of autumn will be left behind. Mistletoe foreshadows the coming of winter. With the firework-like vibrancy and shapes of the Amaranthus and Chrysanthemum, we celebrate the end of a year and the start of a new one.
The body colour is in the titanium white base coat I used to paint the Physalis on (it seals the paper and helps painting fine details).

Turkish filbert (Corylus colurna)

This is an example of my smaller work on vellum, a Turkish filbert hazelnut in its husk. I like how small works on vellum force the viewer to come closer and experience the materiality of the painting: the application of the pigment and unique character of the vellum. As a detail image, I have included an impression of the painting from another angle, providing more of a feel of the painting as an object.

Holcus lanatus

With this close-up of Meadow soft grass, I aimed to elevate this common, sometimes invasive species of grass that many of us tend to just walk past. We often do notice the pink and purple shimmer of this grass as it waves in the wind. I wanted to take a closer look and share my experience.

Lifeboats

This is a painting on paper that illustrates my fascination for fine detail. The seed heads are all personal collection items, and unique in the way they dried. I particularly aimed to capture the subtle colour transitions in their shells, e.g. the purple and golden tinges, as the light wraps around them.

486

Mercedes Castellano-García

Playing with all plastic mediums -mainly oil painting- as a hobby during my whole life, it was a healthy issue which took me away of my busy path and gave me plenty of time at home to dedicate to art. Chances are that I was wanting to really improve my art skills when a workshop of Botanical Illustration was to be given at the Canary Islands -in Spain there is no tradition of Botanical Illustration even if we have in our history a José Celestino Mutis, who did promote this labor during the expeditions to America in the 18th century.
When I felt what could I do through B.I. , I applied to the Society of Botanical Artists and started the Distance Learning Diploma Course in 2017. During that time I travelled to learn from other artists, finishing on 2019. Ever since I haven't done else but botanical illustration. I have worked for a few private commissions but what has been a dream to me is collaborating with Botanical Garden Viera y Clavijo in Gran Canaria.
Flora from the Canary Islands is so rich there is plenty of work to investigate in about the indigenous plants of these volcanic archipielago.

The work I do is a reverence to the Earth. The result of my work is absolutely about Nature. It includes the two subjects I am more passionate in: art and the environment.

Being able to create something slowly, patiently, involving all my senses during the process, gives me the chance to connect with the Earth and its tiny creations. Every time I take home a plant to work on it I know I am going to spend many days almost worshipping its existence, by admiring it and observing and registering its details. Quite a relationship emerges through these long hours, and it all ends by my hands trying to represent in the best way I am able to, the living being I have in front of my eyes.

At these moment, my work is done with graphite and watercolour, and because I have my studio at home, I truly enjoy working with such both clean mediums. When I take notes at the field, it's also easy to do so in both of them.

The presence watercolour demands to be well achieved, as Botanical illustration requieres, gives me the pleasure of trying to do better each time. I like to see that effort translated in the paper, in my drawings, as a way of honouring the natural presents our planet gives to us.

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Navaea phoenicea

Work requested by Botanical Garden Viera y Clavijo as part of a project about polinitation at the macaronesian archipielago (Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands, Cabo Verde) . Navaea phoenicia is a very endangered specimen.

Lotus jacobaeus

Work done as part of the project requested by the Botanical Garden Viera y Clavijo. Lotus jacobaeus is a very delicate plant from Cabo Verde.

Digitalis canariensis

Scientific ilustration requested by Botanical Garden Viera y Clavijo as part of the project "The ornithological element of the Macaronesian archipielago" (Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands and Cabo Verde). Digitalis canariensis is an indigenous plant just found at Tenerife.

Lotus maculatus

Scientific illustration requested by Botanical Garden Viera y Clavijo as part of the project "The ornithological element of the Macaronesian archipielago" (Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands and Cabo Verde). Lotus maculatus is an indigenous plant just found at the occidental islands of the Canary Islands. The information of dissection of this plant was made with the help of Alfredo Reyes, the great taxonomist and director of the Botanical Garden JAO in La Orotava, Tenerife; as well as a big list of other biologist who kindly collaborated with me.

Bunch of happiness

Bunch of Anthurium black queen, Monstera deliciosa, Gaura lindheimeri and Vaccinium corymbosum. This work was submitted as the 12th assessment for the SBA Distance Learning Diploma course (14th).

485

Susan Fuller

I developed a love for botanical art 10 years ago after attending Adult Education classes weekly in Folkestone,Kent. This lead me to develop a liking for all mediums ie watercolour, coloured pencil, pastels, charcoal, graphite, biro and pen and ink. I now run my own small botanical art group twice a week and enjoying passing on my knowledge of botanical art. I have been on many of the botanical artists courses and have learned so much
I have always had a love for flowers and plants and I do prefer to work from life and in watercolour. I would class myself as a traditional artist but leave open avenues for contemporary work
I studied for the SBA Distance Learning Course 10 in 2013 nd passed with credit. I have since then exhibited for a few years at the SBA annual London exhibitions. I have also exhibited at the Kent Florum in 2018. I also used too exhibit at all the local art shows until COVID I have been working on lots of paintings and hope too start exhibiting again this year

I use a selection of mediums. ie graphite, pen and ink , pen, ink , coloured pencil, watercolour and coloured pencil and watercolour. My love is for watercolour and I use different makes of artist quality watercolour paints including winsor and Newton , Schmincke, and Sennelier paints. My favourite paper is Arches HP paper and have recently been using Saunders Waterford HP paper. My love for botanical painting means I can apply an initial wash then I like too build up colour, form and detail with dry brush work. The more detailed the better. My other love is coloured pencil again I like too build up colour with lots of different layers of colour my favourite coloured pencils are Faber Castell polychromos. My inspiration recently has been Beatrix potter I love all her botanical work and have recently been too the Lake District and have taken lots of photographs and reference colours and drawings in sketchbook to start a couple of Fungi paintings

Chinese cabbage

Papava

Carrots

This painting was accepted at the annual SBA exhibition in London

Apples and cob nuts

Iris foetidissima

484

Susan Fuller

I developed a love for botanical art 10 years ago after attending Adult Education classes weekly in Folkestone,Kent. This lead me to develop a liking for all mediums ie watercolour, coloured pencil, pastels, charcoal, graphite, biro and pen and ink. I now run my own small botanical art group twice a week and enjoying passing on my knowledge of botanical art. I have been on many of the botanical artists courses and have learned so much
I have always had a love for flowers and plants and I do prefer to work from life and in watercolour. I would class myself as a traditional artist but leave open avenues for contemporary work
I studied for the SBA Distance Learning Course 10 in 2013 nd passed with credit. I have since then exhibited for a few years at the SBA annual London exhibitions. I have also exhibited at the Kent Florum in 2018. I also used too exhibit at all the local art shows until COVID I have been working on lots of paintings and hope too start exhibiting again this year

I use a selection of mediums. ie graphite, pen and ink , pen, ink , coloured pencil, watercolour and coloured pencil and watercolour. My love is for watercolour and I use different makes of artist quality watercolour paints including winsor and Newton , Schmincke, and Sennelier paints. My favourite paper is Arches HP paper and have recently been using Saunders Waterford HP paper. My love for botanical painting means I can apply an initial wash then I like too build up colour, form and detail with dry brush work. The more detailed the better. My other love is coloured pencil again I like too build up colour with lots of different layers of colour my favourite coloured pencils are Faber Castell polychromos. My inspiration recently has been Beatrix potter I love all her botanical work and have recently been too the Lake District and have taken lots of photographs and reference colours and drawings in sketchbook to start a couple of Fungi paintings

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Chinese cabbage

Papava

Carrots

This painting was accepted at the annual SBA exhibition in London

Apples and cob nuts

Iris foetidissima